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Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

You may still be able to repair the zip file contents if you download the entire zip locally. You may also want to ask the author to repost the attachment.

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Suppose you have a client who has Windows 2000 installed. Your client is using a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows 2000, and your client demands that your Delphi 6 application supports entering Far East (now known as Southeast Asia) international characters, such as Chinese, Korean, Japanese, among others. Delphi defines a Western edition of Windows 2000 as one of the neutral, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish language editions of Windows 2000. Refer to the IsWesternGroup function in the SysUtils unit for more details.

A passive debugging solution for CLX. By: Chee Wee Chua. Abstract: Debugging cross-platform applications is easy with this useful code. By Chee Wee Chua.

Enabling international character support in a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows for your Delphi 6 application. By: Chee Wee Chua. Abstract: This article ...

This article describes how you can enable international character support in a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows for your Delphi 6 application.Written by ...

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

You may still be able to repair the zip file contents if you download the entire zip locally. You may also want to ask the author to repost the attachment.

   Latest Comments   View All   Add New Move mouse over comment to see the full text

Suppose you have a client who has Windows 2000 installed. Your client is using a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows 2000, and your client demands that your Delphi 6 application supports entering Far East (now known as Southeast Asia) international characters, such as Chinese, Korean, Japanese, among others. Delphi defines a Western edition of Windows 2000 as one of the neutral, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish language editions of Windows 2000. Refer to the IsWesternGroup function in the SysUtils unit for more details.

A passive debugging solution for CLX. By: Chee Wee Chua. Abstract: Debugging cross-platform applications is easy with this useful code. By Chee Wee Chua.

Enabling international character support in a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows for your Delphi 6 application. By: Chee Wee Chua. Abstract: This article ...

This article describes how you can enable international character support in a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows for your Delphi 6 application.Written by ...

Suppose you have a client who has Windows 2000 installed. Your client is using a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows 2000, and your client demands that your Delphi 6 application supports entering Far East (now known as Southeast Asia) international characters, such as Chinese, Korean, Japanese, among others. Delphi defines a Western edition of Windows 2000 as one of the neutral, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish language editions of Windows 2000. Refer to the IsWesternGroup function in the SysUtils unit for more details.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

You may still be able to repair the zip file contents if you download the entire zip locally. You may also want to ask the author to repost the attachment.

   Latest Comments   View All   Add New Move mouse over comment to see the full text

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

Developing a cross-platform application using Borland CLX -- the cross-platform application framework for Delphi 6 and Kylix -- is a joy. But sometimes even developers who use the most powerful tools encounter problems.

You may have come across situations in which the IDE's integrated debugger is interfering with the process of debugging. No problem -- that's why NuMega invented SoftICE. Right?

When the going gets tough, tough programmers dust off the old tried-and-true solutions. Like embedding debug messages in your code and writing them to the screen. Preferably to a separate window -- maybe a console window -- so the application you're trying to debug doesn't get its activities messed up.

If you have developed a console application in Windows, youl know that there is an application type directive in the beginning of the project source that tells Delphi to produce a console app. If you are a Windows programming old-timer, you're aware that a Windows application can have either a Windows GUI or a command-line interface. What is not clear is how you make a Delphi application do both at the same time.

You may still be able to repair the zip file contents if you download the entire zip locally. You may also want to ask the author to repost the attachment.

   Latest Comments   View All   Add New Move mouse over comment to see the full text

Suppose you have a client who has Windows 2000 installed. Your client is using a Western (or non Far East) edition of Windows 2000, and your client demands that your Delphi 6 application supports entering Far East (now known as Southeast Asia) international characters, such as Chinese, Korean, Japanese, among others. Delphi defines a Western edition of Windows 2000 as one of the neutral, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish language editions of Windows 2000. Refer to the IsWesternGroup function in the SysUtils unit for more details.